Blood, Milk, and Death: Body Symbols and the Power of Regeneration among the Zaramo of Tanzania

By Marja-Liisa Swantz; Salome Mjema et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

This book was compiled and edited by Zenya Wild from my collected writings, and from the work of other members of my family, my husband Lloyd W. Swantz and my daughter Aili Mari Tripp, as well as daughters Eva and Lea with whom I have had the joy to share life and research among the Zaramo. My mentor and friend, Bengt Sundkler, has also been a constant source of inspiration.

I owe a tremendous debt to Zenya for the insightful way with which she has immersed herself in the Zaramo cultural life. I thank warmly Frédérique Marglin who suggested the writing of this book in this form and had the wisdom to suggest Zenya for the task. In parts, the book follows closely the original texts in earlier books and articles, listed in the Bibliography; in other parts the form and even the content are new. In all the parts, the language has been transformed to a more readable style in the interest of the reader for whom the usual anthropological jargon might be an obstacle. I hope that this story of the Zaramo culture will provide inspiring reading, particularly for undergraduates and for non-Africans who live and work in Africa. It gives a few glimpses into the enormous cultural wealth of the creative, warm, and welcoming people of the suffering yet joyful continent and specifically of the country of Tanzania.

I dedicate this book to the memory of my deceased friends in Bunju, my village father Salum Mhunzi, my dear friends Mwawila Binti Shomvi, Mzee Ndamba, Abdurahamani Fundi and Binti Fundi. I hereby express also my deep gratitude to Emma and Samson Mwakalasya without whom I never would have come to live in Bunju.

-vii-

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Blood, Milk, and Death: Body Symbols and the Power of Regeneration among the Zaramo of Tanzania
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Glossary 139
  • References 143
  • Selected Bibliography 145
  • Index 155
  • About the Author *
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