Executive Governance: Presidential Administrations and Policy Change in the Federal Bureaucracy

By Cornell G. Hooton | Go to book overview

4
Programmatic Context

1. Job Interpretation and Culture

Another trend that arose was the portrayal of job roles organized around thematic interpretations. The thematic interpretations identified the tasks for an office and how to approach them within the larger set of programs and statutory obligations for the bureau. Within UMTA respondents presented concerns for "doing the job," the interpretations of which reflected explicit job assignments or perceptions of their part of the programmatic trust. For example, respondents made numerous comments on the obligation of the planning offices to develop applications for mass transit grants, emphasizing that the planning offices were obligated to develop project applications so that they received grants. One careerist described a prevailing emphasis on getting money to local transit managers rather than on ensuring that a thorough analysis of the application had been made:

I don't know that any of the new starts [of transit projects] through the mid-'70s actually had alternatives analysis done before they received commitments. It was done for some afterwards. It was really old-fashioned grantsmanship. You made a phone call. You lobbied. Not alternatives analysis. It was the best of grant-making. You got the money to the transit manager.... (Iw T-17)

The emphasis on the production of grants was consonant with legal and administrative pressures to move the workload and with regular inquiries in congressional committee hearings. In the annual budget hearings before the House Appropriations subcommittee on transportation, for example, committee members typically probed the status of major project applications, pressed UMTA representatives to move them along, inquired about the bureau's analysis capabilities, and expressed concerns about the rate at which smaller grants flowed. Committee members, including the chair, also regularly requested that UMTA submit a list of all pending applications and of the geographic

-66-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Executive Governance: Presidential Administrations and Policy Change in the Federal Bureaucracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.