Knowing Other-Wise: Philosophy at the Threshold of Spirituality

By James H. Olthuis | Go to book overview

2
Points of Convergence Between
Dooyeweerdian and Feminist Views
of the Philosophic Self

Janet Catherina Wesselius

RECENTLY IN NORTH AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY, there has been a growing number of challenges to the traditional, Kantian concept of the self, otherwise known as the transcendental logical ego. 1 Many of the challenges come from feminist philosophers who attempt to transform traditional philosophy by proposing a more complex view of self than that offered by traditional philosophy. 2 Feminist philosophy is a recent phenomenon in the history of philosophy, arising as it does out of the contemporary feminist movement. 3 But fifty-five years ago the Christian philosopher Herman Dooyeweerd, working in the continental tradition of philosophy, was already advocating a view of the self that is remarkably similar to the contemporary feminist view in its emphasis on integration. 4 His critique of the transcendental logical ego is rooted in his Christian conviction that philosophy is influenced by religious commitments, whereas many feminist critiques are rooted in the realization that the traditional concept of self is unable to account for the experiences of women.

Dooyeweerd asserts that "philosophical thinking is an actual activity; and only at the expense of this very actuality (and then merely in a theoretic concept) can it be abstracted from the thinking self."5 Many feminist philosophers also argue that people do philosophy only as aggregate and complex beings.For example, Lorraine Code also asserts that "it is persons who know—not abstracted, isolated intellects, understandings, imaginations, or faculties of reason." 6 Without claiming that Dooyeweerd was a feminist, I argue here that his Christian goal of replacing the transcendental logical ego with the multi-faceted person in philosophic thinking finds resonance in the concerns of many feminists. 7

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Knowing Other-Wise: Philosophy at the Threshold of Spirituality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Knowing Other-Wise - Philosophy at the Threshold of Spirituality *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction: Love/Knowledge *
  • Philosophy and Its Other *
  • 1: Conceptual Understanding and Knowing Other-Wise *
  • 2: Points of Convergence Between Dooyeweerdian and Feminist Views of the Philosophic Self *
  • 3: Taking the Risk of Essence *
  • Ethics And/Of the Other *
  • 4: Singular Interruptions *
  • 5: Face-To-Face *
  • 6: Structures of Violence, Structures of Peace *
  • 7: Again Ethics *
  • A God With/For the Other *
  • 8: How to Avoid Not Speaking *
  • 9: Crossing the Threshold *
  • Index of Names *
  • Index of Subjects *
  • Notes on Contributors *
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