Break-Ins, Death Threats, and the FBI: The Covert War against the Central America Movement

By Ross Gelbspan | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

So very many people helped make this book possible that merely to list their names, let alone acknowledge my debts to them, would take pages. My apologies, as well as my gratitude, go to all those who are not acknowledged by name here.

Any thanks must begin with Tottie, Thea and Joby, who contributed far more to this book than any family members should ever have to give. Numerous personal friends permitted me to secret copies of documents, tapes and computer disks with them—and provided safe phones and mailing addresses—during a period when our own phones were tapped and mail opened, and we lived in fairly constant fear of break-ins.

I am especially grateful to Lance Lindblom and the J. Roderick MacArthur Foundation for their financial help and their unswerving encouragement. Now that Mr. Lindblom has recovered his own FBI files, I can assure him he is in excellent company.

To John Roberts and the Board of the Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts I owe a great gratitude for their institutional, as well as personal, support. I am especially indebted to Jeff McConnell for the hours he spent helping me pick through clues to sort out the mysterious patterns of activity that lay below the surface of the break-ins. Chip Berlet and Bob Greenberg were as generous with their own sources of information as they were with the time and thought they donated to this project.

Dan Alcom was particularly helpful on several occasions in mediating my relationship with his client, Frank Varelli, as well as in his encouragement throughout. Thanks are due, as well, to Lindsay Mattison and Robert White for their financial support of Varelli and their intellectual support for this book early in the project.

Clearly I owe a great deal of gratitude to the people at the Center for Constitutional Rights—especially Ann Mari Buitrago, David Lemer, Adelita Medina and Alicia Femandes, as well as Margaret and Michael Ratner—who opened their files and their recollections to me. Professor

-viii-

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