Break-Ins, Death Threats, and the FBI: The Covert War against the Central America Movement

By Ross Gelbspan | Go to book overview

4
Back Channel Partners: The FBI
and the National Guard

With the approval of his superiors in the Dallas FBI office, Varelli made arrangements to return to El Salvador in the spring of 1981 to establish a channel of communications that, for the next five years, would help guide the Bureau in its fight against Salvadoran immigrants and U.S. political activists opposing the Reagan Administration's policies in Central America.

Varelli's arrival in San Salvador on April 10, 1981 was an emotional homecoming. He was met by his lifelong friend, Antonio Villacorta. The former Jesuit priest had been selected by Col. Eugenio Vides Casanova, director of the National Guard, to conduct ideological counter-insurgency training for the Guard and to handle the Guard's public information and press relations. 1 Unknown to all but a very few people in the Salvadoran government, Villacorta was also Vides Casanova's hand‐ picked secret intelligence operative who reported directly to him rather than to the official head of the G-2 Unit of the National Guard.

But there was another, deeper connection between Varelli and the National Guard. As a young man in training at the Salvadoran Military Academy, Vides Casanova had been a top student of Varelli's father, Col. Agustin Martinez Varela, who, at the time, was commander of the cadet company of the Military Academy of El Salvador. As the senior Varela's career progressed through his assignment to the General Staff Command, his appointment as director of the National Police and, later, as the Salvadoran Minister of the Interior, Vides Casanova served under him on several occasions. In fact, Vides Casanova had met young Franklin when the boy was only three days old when his father brought his infant son to the Academy on a fine spring day in 1950 to show him off. Seventeen years later, when Varelli enrolled in the Academy as a cadet,

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Break-Ins, Death Threats, and the FBI: The Covert War against the Central America Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 257

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.