Break-Ins, Death Threats, and the FBI: The Covert War against the Central America Movement

By Ross Gelbspan | Go to book overview

12
The Heart of the Terror Network

By 6 Monday morning, Varelli found it impossible to sleep any longer. This morning, December 12, was the opening meeting of the Capitol Bombing Task Force and he was too charged up even to stay in bed any longer. By 7, he was at the Twin Bridges Marriott Hotel near National Airport where Flanagan was staying—nearly two hours before the meeting of the Capitol Bombing Task Force was to convene. 1

Around 8:30, Edmundo Mirelles and his partner, Tim Weber, both counter-intelligence agents from the FBI's Washington Field Office arrived at the hotel. They were followed by two members of the intelligence unit of the Washington Police Department and, in turn, by two Secret Service agents who introduced themselves and explained they were attached to the National Security Council. In all, there were about a dozen people present. When Manny Johnson, a black FBI supervisor from the WFO introduced himself, Flanagan quietly told Varelli to ignore whatever he said. Johnson was there, Flanagan added, as part of the quota system.

Varelli recalled later that he felt guilty at not responding to Johnson—a soft-spoken, well-educated agent. But he was under orders from Flanagan, who displayed the kind of racism Varelli had seen frequently at the Bureau.

There was some small talk, including references to the Soviet shootdown the previous month of KAL flight 007. The task force meeting came to order when Ron Davenport, Headquarters' man in charge of the El Salvador Terrorism investigation arrived with a huge stack of files and photographs. 2

The short, stocky Davenport emanated a strong sense of personal command. With his conservative suits, his straight-back hair and his occasionally sarcastic tone, he always seemed to evoke instant attention from the agents he worked with. But despite his no-nonsense demeanor,

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Break-Ins, Death Threats, and the FBI: The Covert War against the Central America Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 257

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.