Lay My Burden Down: A Folk History of Slavery

By B. A. Botkin | Go to book overview

PART FIVE
All I Know about Freedom

But, as I was saying, the slaves was still hunting a better place and more freedom. The young folks is still hunting a better place and more freedom.

The slaves heard the news of freedom in different ways—some earlier, some later, some secretly, but all hopefully. "Everybody talk 'bout freedom and hope to git free 'fore they die." They all expected freedom and wanted it, even if "it wasn't like what they thought it would be." Nor did they all think of it in the same way. To some freedom was a word, a strange word—"When I first heard them talking about freedom, I didn't know what freedom was." To others it was a person—"Big children all laugh and say: 'All niggers free, all niggers free.' And I'd say: 'What is free?' I was looking for a man to come." To still others it was a place—"right off colored folks started on the move. They seemed to want to get closer to freedom, so they'd know what it was—like it was a place or a city."

Being free as a jay bird or a toad-frog, as they said, they obeyed the first impulse, which was one of flight or movement. Some were gone before the master was halfway through telling them they were free. Others went off and came back because they "didn't have no place to go and nothing to eat Seemed like it was four or five years before they got to places they could live." Some stayed on for a time and worked on shares, until the master died, and then they scattered.

The masters, too, reacted to emancipation in different ways. Some said: "You all go on away You have to look out for yourselves now." Others said: "Go if you wants, and stay if you wants." Some gave their Negroes a small piece of land to work. "But the mostest of them never give 'em nothing, and they sure despise them niggers what left 'em"; ".... a heap of the marses got raging mad and just tore up truck They shot niggers down by the hundreds." Still others made the Negroes work on for several months or a year

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lay My Burden Down: A Folk History of Slavery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Lay My Burden Down - A Folk History of Slavery *
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Table of Contents xv
  • Part One - Mother Wit 1
  • Part Two - Long Remembrance 59
  • Part Three - From Can to Can'T 137
  • Part Four - A War among the White Folks 191
  • Part Five - All I Know about Freedom 221
  • List of Informants and Interviewers 271
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 285

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.