PART III
REGULATIONS AND SPECULATIONS

The final two chapters of the book contain material that is in some ways different from the material contained in the first seven chapters. Most of the material in earlier chapters was based on evidence gathered from research laboratories involving well-established research paradigms. By contrast, most of the material in the last two chapters is either descriptive (e.g., of the regulatory process) or speculative. In my opinion this does not make the material any less reliable or truthful, but it does mean that it has a different basis in fact. In the first two parts of the book I was speaking as a scientist reviewing the work of other scientists. In this last part I am attempting to describe and report on the work of people who have tried to regulate the television industry, or who have tried to mitigate the effects of television through private, educational efforts.

Chapter 8 describes a series of efforts made by two governmental regulatory agencies (the FCC and FTC) to set up rules and regulations about the television industry's responsibility in programming for children and in manipulating children through advertising. Such an analysis first requires a brief description of the regulatory process itself, especially as it relates to the needs and special vulnerabilities of children. While First Amendment restrictions prohibit government intervention with regard to most of the content of television, television designed for children has received

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