Subject Index

A
Advertising, see also Nonprogram content
amount of, 180-184
beginning of, 9
children's advertising, 202-214, 238- 246
consumer socialization, 245
effects of, 210-212
false advertising, 239-240
food advertising, 244-45, history of, 202-203
misleading advertising, 240
parent-child conflict, 245-46
unfair means, 240-241
unfair ends, 241
unintended effects of, 212-214
volume and repetition, 245
effects of, 173-176, 216-217
regulation of, 201-202
theories of,
McGuire's theory, 217-219
Psychographics and VALS, 219-220
Adolescent viewing, 39 see also MTV
Age portrayals on television, in programs, 73-74, 137
in ads, 194
Aggression and television, see also Violence on television, effects summary, 115-119
Alcohol consumption, 77
Arbitron, 26 see also Audience
measurement
Arousal, 109-112
law of initial values, 111-112
program characteristics that lead to, 110-111
reducing arousal (unwinding), 112
Attention to television, 145-156
and age, 149-151
and comprehension, 154-156
and content, 151-153
bit changes, 152
human characters, 152
non-human characters, 152-153
zooms and pans, 152
Attentional inertia, 153-154
Attitudes, 121-122
about the media, 43
about violence in society, 269-271
about body image, 271-272
personal versus societal, 139-140, 141
Audio/visual effects of ads, 243
Audience Measurement, ratings services, 24-26
limitations of, 27

-321-

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