Conflict and Compromise: International Law and World Order in a Revolutionary Age

By Edward McWhinney | Go to book overview

3 THE CONSTITUTIONALISM
OF WORLD ORDER
UN Security Council and General Assembly as
"Parliament of Mankind"

The United Nations organization, as achieved at the San Francisco Conference in 1945, was the creation of the victorious "wartime Alliance against Fascism." By definition, the defeated Axis powers did not participate in its creation; nor did the few remaining neutral countries who outlived the war. These latter, indeed, when they later came to apply for membership, had to run the political gauntlet in meeting the legal criteria for membership established under the Charter. The Soviet jurist, Judge Krylov, in a dissenting opinion in the World Court Advisory Opinion of 1948 on Conditions of Admission of a State to Membership in the United Nations, suggested that Eire was not a "peace-loving" state, as stipulated in Article 4 (1) of the Charter, because it had not taken part in World War II. In Judge Krylov's view, to be peace-loving was no mere passive state of mind, as the terms used in the French text of the Charter — "état pacifique" — might imply. On the contrary, the English text's "peace‐ loving," the Spanish text's "amantes de la paz," and also the Russian and Chinese texts, had a more active sense, which made "tak(ing) part in World War II alongside the democratic countries" a relevant criterion for admission to membership in the United Nations.

The point is, of course, that the United Nations Charter, originally conceived and drafted as a blueprint of world public order, was the creation of only a part of the world community — the victorious Allies. Even here, the actual drafting was the work of a relatively small group of major powers, with the Soviet

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conflict and Compromise: International Law and World Order in a Revolutionary Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 160

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.