NOTE

I N a quiet corner of the stately little city of Wheeling, West Va., stands a monument on which is inscribed:

"By authority of the State of West Virginia, to commemorate the siege of Fort Henry, Sept. 11, 1782, the last battle of the American Revolution, this tablet is here placed."

Had it not been for the heroism of a girl the foregoing inscription would never have been written, and the city of Wheeling would never have existed.

From time to time I have read short stories and magazine articles which have been published about Elizabeth Zane and her famous exploit; but they are unreliable in some particulars, which is owing, no doubt, to the singularly meagre details available in histories of our western border.

For a hundred years the stories of Betty and Isaac Zane have been familiar, oft-repeated tales in my family--tales told with that pardonable ancestral pride which seems inherent in every one. My grandmother loved to cluster the children round her and tell them that when she was a little girl she had knelt at the feet of Betty Zane, and listened to the old lady as she told of her brother's capture by the Indian Princess, of the burning of the Fort, and of her own race for life. I knew these stories by heart when a child.

Two years ago my mother came to me with an old note book which had been discovered in some rubbish that had been placed in the yard to burn. The book had probably been hidden in an old picture frame for many years. It had belonged to my great-grandfather, Col. Ebenezer

-vii-

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Betty Zane
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Note vii
  • Prologue ix
  • Chapter I 15
  • Chapter II 27
  • Chapter III 51
  • Chapter IV 73
  • Chapter V 101
  • Chapter VI 117
  • Chapter VII 133
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 181
  • Chapter X 195
  • Chapter XI 211
  • Chapter XII 237
  • Chapter XIII 249
  • Chapter XIV 263
  • Chapter XV 277
  • Afterword. 289
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