CHAPTER VIII.

W INTER dragged by uneventfully for Betty. Unlike the other pioneer girls, who were kept busy all the time with their mending, and linsey weaving, and household duties, Betty had nothing to divert her but her embroidery and her reading. These she found very tiresome. Her maid was devoted to her and never left a thing undone. Annie was old Sam's daughter, and she had waited on Betty since she had been a baby. The cleaning or mending or darning--anything in the shape of work that would have helped pass away the monotonous hours for Betty, was always done before she could lift her hand.

During the day she passed hours in her little room and most of them were dreamed away by her window. Lydia and Alice came over sometimes and whiled away the tedious moments with their bright chatter and merry laughter, their castle-building, and their romancing on heroes and love and marriage as girls always will until the end of time. They had not forgotten Mr. Clarke, but as Betty had rebuked them with a dignity which forbade any further teasing on that score, they had transferred their fun-making to the use of Mr. Miller's name.

Fearing her brothers' wrath Betty had not told them of the scene with Miller at the dance. She had learned enough of rough border justice to dread the consequence of such a disclosure. She permitted Miller to come to the house, although she never saw him alone. Miller had accepted this favor gratefully. He said that on the night of the dance he had been a little the worse for Dan Watkins' strong liquor, and that, together with his bitter disappointment, made him act in the mad way which had so grievously offended her.

-155-

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Betty Zane
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Note vii
  • Prologue ix
  • Chapter I 15
  • Chapter II 27
  • Chapter III 51
  • Chapter IV 73
  • Chapter V 101
  • Chapter VI 117
  • Chapter VII 133
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 181
  • Chapter X 195
  • Chapter XI 211
  • Chapter XII 237
  • Chapter XIII 249
  • Chapter XIV 263
  • Chapter XV 277
  • Afterword. 289
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