CHAPTER XI.

T HE following afternoon the sun shone fair and warm; the sweet smell of the tan-bark pervaded the air; and the birds sang their gladsome songs. The scene before the grim, battle-scarred old fort was not without its picturesqueness. The low vine-covered cabins on the hillside looked more like picture houses than like real habitations of men; the mill with its burned-out roof--a reminder of the Indians--and its great wheel, now silent and still, might have been from its lonely and dilapidated appearance a hundred years old.

On a little knoll carpeted with velvety grass sat Isaac and his Indian bride. He had selected this vantage point because it afforded a fine view of the green square where the races and the matches were to take place. Admiring women stood around him and gazed at his wife. They gossiped in whispers about her white skin, her little hands, her beauty. The girls stared with wide open and wondering eyes. The youngsters ran round and round the little group; they pushed each other over, and rolled in the long grass, and screamed with delight.

It was to be a gala occasion and every man, woman and child in the settlement had assembled on the green. Col. Zane and Sam were planting a post in the center of the square. It was to be used in the shooting matches. Capt. Boggs and Major McColloch were arranging the contestants in order. Jonathan Zane, Will Martin, Alfred Clarke--all the young men were carefully charging and priming their rifles. Betty was sitting on the black stallion which Col. Zane had generously offered as first prize. She was in the gayest of moods and had just coaxed Isaac to lift her on the tall horse, from which height she purposed watching the sports. Wetzel alone did not seem infected by the spirit of gladsomeness

-211-

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Betty Zane
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Note vii
  • Prologue ix
  • Chapter I 15
  • Chapter II 27
  • Chapter III 51
  • Chapter IV 73
  • Chapter V 101
  • Chapter VI 117
  • Chapter VII 133
  • Chapter VIII 155
  • Chapter IX 181
  • Chapter X 195
  • Chapter XI 211
  • Chapter XII 237
  • Chapter XIII 249
  • Chapter XIV 263
  • Chapter XV 277
  • Afterword. 289
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