Judaism Eternal: Selected Essays from the Writings of Samson Raphael Hirsch - Vol. 1

By I. Grunfeld; Samson Raphael Hirsch | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
TAMMUZ

The Seventeenth of Tammuz--a Recollection of five Tragedies in Jewish History.

On the seventeenth day of Tammuz five sorrowful events occurred: The tablets were broken when Moses descended from the mountain the continual sacrifice was abolished on that day; the city of Jerusalem was broken into; Apostomos the wicked burnt the Torah and, in addition, placed an idol in the Temple. The sun shines brightly, all the fields smile with the ripening crops. Israel's glance, however, is turned to the past, its past, and it is thoughts of --destruction, overthrow and ruin-- that the sun-laden Tammuz brings into every true Jewish breast. Many a page of Jewish history has been written with tears; but the most tear-stained pages have been produced by the "Three Weeks", and the great tragedies of Jewish history, associated with the names of Nebuchadnezzar, Titus and Ferdinand, chose this period for their mournful consummation. This is to say in effect that all this story is only the continuation of an ancient doom, that the same hand of God is to be seen in it all, that it is the same cause always producing the same effects, and that the Galuth which began with Nebuchadnezzar will never end until the last traces of the old doubts and perplexities which have brought Galuth to Israel have been completely overcome in the hard school of the Galuth.

For this reason, as we have already stated before, it is not mourning which is the dominant note of our days of remembrance for the

, but "fasting", that is, searching our hearts in order to find our way back and up, recognising the causes of our downfall and mustering our energies for completely eliminating them from our midst. This is the task

-117-

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Judaism Eternal: Selected Essays from the Writings of Samson Raphael Hirsch - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Samson Raphael Hirsch--The Man And His Mission xiii
  • Bibliography xlix
  • Part I - Reflections on The Jewish Calendar Year 1
  • Chapter II - Cheshvan 15
  • Chapter III - Kislev 20
  • Chapter IV - Tebeth 29
  • Chapter V - Shebat 35
  • Chapter VI Adar 47
  • Chapter VII - Nisan 57
  • Chapter IX - Sivan 88
  • Chapter X - Tammuz 117
  • Chapter XI - Av 126
  • Chapter XII - Elul Shofar and Selichoth 142
  • Part II - Jewish Education 153
  • Chapter XIV - Religious Instruction 160
  • Chapter XV - On the Place of Ethical Training in School Education 174
  • Chapter XVI - On Hebrew Instruction As Part of a General Education 188
  • Chapter XVII - The Relation of General To Specially Jewish Education 203
  • Part III - Educational Talks 221
  • Chapter XVIII - Educational Talks 223
  • Educational Talks 232
  • Index of Subjects 253
  • Index to Passages Cited 268
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