Origins: Brain and Self Organization

By Karl Pribram | Go to book overview

Abstract

At issue is the observer-observed relation, here concieved of as a quantum self-referential constructive reefferent-reafferent, assimilation-accommodation, or cognitive-peripheral perceptual process in which no term can be defined independently of any other. In quantum physics such self-reference can be found, for example, in the suggestion by d'Espagnat ( 1983) that consciousness and physical reality are like reflections in two opposed mirrors. In such a model the Cartesian duality of mind and matter is overcome.

Self-reference in perception can be dealt with by going to Pribram ( 1991) quantum mechanical brain theory, and to quantum physical extensions thereof by Gyr or Wolf which hypothesize holonomic interference of a reefferent-reafferent ( Gyr et al., 1979) or an assimilation-accommodation ( Piaget, 1971) type.

Pribram deduces that the spatiotemporal constancy characterizing the perception of form as well as the transformational spectral information of global tacit perception - the »grammar« and »semantics« of figural processing - are computed self-referentially in quantum mechanical brain of a motorically active perceiver. This sensory perception capacity can be compared to a pinhole camera system in which there is a transformation of waves into points in space and vice versa. The camera itself remains macroscopic, however.

The holonomic extension proposed in this paper by Gyr or by Wolf ( 1984, 1988), based on the parallel worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, suggests that the pinhole camera itself also is a micro system which represents the observer's motoric. It can interfere holonomically with the sensory in brain, thereby causing

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