Origins: Brain and Self Organization

By Karl Pribram | Go to book overview
time to sample and respond to items that were initially unattended. This of course is what we observed for right temporal lobe patients in the second experiment. Although we have as yet been unable to test frontal patients under similar conditions, the prediction is that they would benefit much less than temporal patients from increased exposure duration during conjunction search.
Acknowledgements
1. The author wishes to thank Dr. Manfred Meier, who generously supplied a complete set of materials for the Complex Visual Discrimination test.
2. Data from temporal lobectomy cases were collected by Nicole Lanthier, and have been presented in her Honours undergraduate thesis, "Anterior temporal control of attention to visual features", University of Winnipeg, 1993.
3. We wish to thank the neurosurgical patients and students who consented to perform these perceptual tasks, for their willing participation and valuable contribution.
4. We wish to thank the members of the departments of neurosurgery, neurology, and radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, who referred patients into these experiments, and the administrative staff of the Health Sciences Centre and St. Boniface hospital in Winnipeg for their support of this project.

References

Bolster, R.B & Birk, P. ( 1988) Effects of focal forebrain injury on feature-based visual search. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 14 (1) 218.

Bolster, R. B., & Pribram, K. H. ( 1993) Cortical involvement in visual scan in the monkey. Perception & Psychophysics, 53 (5), 505-518.

Cutcomb, S. D., Bolster, R.B, & Pribram, K. H. ( 1981). DADTA-VI: A minicomputer-based video control system for the analysis of behavioral and electrophysiological data. Behavior Research Methods and Instrumentation, 13, 337-340.

Douglas, R. J.; Barrett, T. W., Pribram, K. H. & Cerny, M. C. ( 1969). Limbic lesions and error reduction. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 69, 473-480

Effron, Robert ( 1990) The decline and fall of hemispheric specialization. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.

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