Prospective Community Studies in Developing Countries

By Monica Das Gupta; Peter Aaby et al. | Go to book overview

12 Bandim: An Unplanned Longitudinal Study

PETER AABY


12.1 Introduction

The tide of the chapter may be a contradiction in terms. However, the project was initially planned to last one or two years. Interaction with the first observations forced us to go on collecting more data, which again produced observations which needed to be explained, etc. This process is essential in research. However, funding of the process may be difficult to obtain these days, with research tending to become routinized as rigorous testing of specific hypotheses. The range of possible answers to the research question needs to be predefined to be funded. This makes much research trivial, at least to an anthropologist whose concept of research is exploring and making sense of the unknown ( Aaby 1988).


12.2 History of Project

The present chapter is the history of why and how the project in Bissau became an ongoing inquiry. The emphasis is on the relation between interventions, research, and how observations were made. More detailed information on routine data collected, census, personnel, affiliated researcher, and institutional arrangements are provided in Table 12.1.


12.3 Nutritional Studies, 1978-83

Guinea-Bissau became independent in 1974 after a long and violent war of liberation. Survey data on age distribution of children conducted in the first two years after independence indicated that under-5 mortality in Bissau was likely to be in the order of 50011,000. The Ministry of Public Health (MINSAP) therefore asked SAREC--Swedish Agency for Research Co-operation with Developing Countries--to organize a study to help MINSAP define the nutritional priorities in preventive health care. The project was to determine the problems in order for the population to be mobilized to change their own nutritional and health-related practices, thus reducing mortality.

The project was explicitly interdisciplinary with an emphasis on social science. The team funded by SAREC consisted of three full-time members, an

-276-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Prospective Community Studies in Developing Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.