A Treasury of Great Poems: English and American

By Louis Untermeyer | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

BEFORE listing the publishers and agents whose co-operation has been invaluable, I must mention a few of the friends and colleagues to whom I owe particular gratitude.

For countless suggestions, as well as for stimulating support during the preparation of the manuscript, I am most indebted to my friend (though my publisher) M. Lincoln Schuster, whose enthusiasm has been surpassed only by his understanding.

The addition of several shrewd observations and the subtraction of many dangling participles are due to the sotto voce comments of Richard L. Simon.

For Suggestive material, research, and verification, I am grateful to librarians, teachers, and nonprofessional scholars all over the country, especially to Charles D. Abbott, Fannie Elizabeth Ratchford, C. W. Hatfield, David McCord, Maria Leiper, Eleanor Gertrude Brown, and Frank Ernest Hill.

For a microscopic editorial reading of the manuscript with one eye on the author and one on the printer, I am deeply indebted to Wallace Brockway.

The paragraphs preceding THE SONG OF SONGS are part of an introduction written for the edition of THE SONG OF SONGS to be priqted for The Limited Editions Club in Palestine. The introductory paragraphs to THE RUBÁIYÁT OF OMAR KHAYYÁM appeared in a somewhat different version as a foreword to the edition of that poem published by PocketBOOKS, Inc.

A few sentences have been quoted from the author's introduction to the Modern Library edition of THE CANTERBURY TALES, as well as a few lines from his PLAY IN POETRY and AMERICAN POETRY: FROM THE BEGINNING TO WHITMAN, both of which are published by Harcourt, Brace and Company.

I am particularly happy to record my indebtedness to the various publishers and agents who have graciously permitted the use of poems copyrighted or controlled by them. This indebtedness is alphabetically acknowledged to:

Brandt and Brandt, Inc. For THE MOUNTAIN WHPOORWILL from

-1229-

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A Treasury of Great Poems: English and American
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • In Praise of Poetry vii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xlvii
  • I - The Bible 1
  • II - Foundations of the English Spirit 61
  • III - The Popular Ballad 123
  • IV - Early Songs of Unknown Authorship 163
  • V - Toward the Golden Age 175
  • VI - Elizabethan Songs of Unknown Authorship 253
  • VII - William Shakespeare [1564-1616] 271
  • VIII - Anatomy of the World 319
  • IX - Gallants, Puritans, and Divines 389
  • X - The Rise and Fall of Elegance 503
  • XI - Pure Vision, Pure Song 595
  • XII - The Spirit of Revolution and Romance 633
  • XIII - Faith, Doubt, and Democracy 777
  • XIV - Challenge to Tradition 889
  • XV - The World of the Twentieth Century 1023
  • Acknowledgments 1229
  • Sources of Reference 1233
  • Index 1235
  • Index of First Lines 1265
  • A Note about the Author *
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