American Critics at Work: Examinations of Contemporary Literary Theories

By Victor A. Kramer | Go to book overview

'Do you know the mountain and its cloud-bridge?" is an awkward enough translation but the idea of mountain and bridge is so very suitable to this whole translation of the Professor and our work together. Steg really means a plank; foot-bridge is the more accurate rendering. It is not a bridge for a great crowd of people, and it is a bridge flung, as it were, across the abyss, not built and hammered and constructed. There is plenty of psychoanalytic building and constructing: . . . We are dealing with the realm of fantasy and imagination, flung across the abyss, and these are the poet's lines" ( Tribute, p. 108). 7


NOTES
1
Moses and Monotheism, trans. by Katherine Jones ( New York: Vintage, 1967), p. 52. Hereafter cited in text as Moses.
2
"Pound and the Decentered Image", Georgia Review, 29 ( Fall 1975), 565-91. Deleuze's argument is most forcefully put in "Antilogos, or the Literary Machine", chapter VIII of his revised and expanded Proust and Signs, trans. by Richard. Howard ( New York: Braziller, 1972).
3
Quotations from H. D.'s work, hereafter cited in the text, are from the following texts: Trilogy ( New York: New Directions, 1973); Tribute to Freud ( Boston: Godline, 1974.), hereafter Tribute; Helen in Egypt, introd. by Horace Gregory ( New York: New Directions, 1961); and Hermetic Definition, ( New York: New Directions, 1972).
4
H. D. and the Poetics of 'Spiritual Realism'," Contemporary Literature, 10 ( Autumn 1969), 447-73;
5
Derrida, perons, introd. by Stefano Agosti (Venezia: Corbo e Fiore, n.d.). Hereafter cited as Spurs, the English translation of this long essay which is produced in this text along with translations of the essay into German and Italian. The essay is subtitled, "Les Styles de Nietzsche", and is an extensively revised and expanded version of an earlier essay which was first called "The Problem of Style" or "The Question of Style"" ( LaQuestion du style).

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