New Arenas for Violence: Homicide in the American Workplace

By Michael D. Kelleher | Go to book overview

2
History of Occupational Homicide

A method of statistically examining homicide in the workplace was first developed in the 1980s in an effort to categorize this crime by utilizing Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) categories or the Alphabetic Index of Industries and Occupations produced by the U.S. Department of Commerce. 1, 2 When viewed in this way, acts of violence in the workplace were summarized by professions, with a view to detailing risk within each job category. The method of using SIC categorization is today a common approach found in general survey results released by government agencies; it has the advantage of presenting key homicide data in a revealing and easily understood manner.

A series of longitudinal studies undertaken by NIOSH, examining workplace homicides for the period 1980-1989, used the SIC categories in Table 2.1 to summarize their results. 3


Table 2.1: NIOSH SIC Categories
Taxicab establishments
Liquor stores
Gas stations
Detective/protective services
Justice/public order establishments
Grocery stores
Jewelry stores
Hotels/motels
Eating/drinking places

In addition to these categories, to further refine their data, NIOSH relied on the Bureau of Census occupational definitions as outlined in Table 2.2. 4

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New Arenas for Violence: Homicide in the American Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Murder in the Workplace 1
  • Notes 8
  • 2 - History of Occupational Homicide 9
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - Case Studies of Occupational Homicide 49
  • Notes 98
  • 4 - Violence Imperatives and Prevention Techniques 101
  • Notes 167
  • 5 - Conclusions and Recommendations 171
  • Appendix 181
  • Selected Bibliography 185
  • Index 189
  • About the Author 194
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