New Arenas for Violence: Homicide in the American Workplace

By Michael D. Kelleher | Go to book overview
C. Gather as much information as possible about workplace violence in order to educate team members.
D. Form networking relationships with outside agencies that may be needed in the violence prevention program.
E. Develop a written plan for violence prevention; incorporate this plan into the existing safety program.
F. Develop a training program for staff and management that emphasizes violence prevention and appropriate responses to violent incidents.
2. Assess the current level of organizational security and establish new or improved methods as needed.
3. Develop a crisis management plan that is capable of responding to any workplace disruption, including violence.
4. Implement the training program developed by the violence prevention team. Be sure that the trainees are familiar with the recognition process as well as preventative measures and post-incident response measures.
5. Implement a strong employment process that includes proper evaluation and screening methodologies.
6. Document all incidents that indicate potential violence. Have these incidents reviewed by human resources personnel and, if appropriate, legal counsel for further involvement.
7. Effectively use the employee assistance program (EAP) to assist employees in difficulty before they become violent.
8. Appoint an individual responsible for media interface as part of the organizational prevention program.

MANTELL SEVEN-STEP APPROACH TO VIOLENCE PREVENTION
Michael Mantell, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry for the School of Medicine at the University of California San Diego, identified the following seven-step factors crucial to violence prevention in his book Ticking Bombs -- Defusing Violence in the Workplace: 45
1. preemployment screening;
2. informed, aware management trained to see the early warning signs (of potential violence);
3. management understanding of the "golden rule" of employee treatment;
4. education programs to teach employees and the organization how to respond to threatening interpersonal situations;
5. counseling services for employees and their families for job or personal problems;
6. proper security measures to protect the organization and the employees;
7. workplace violence aftermath training.

NOTES
1.
Smith, S. L., "Dealing with a Crisis," Occupational Hazards, 1 Oct. 1993: 30.
2.
Jenny McCune, "Companies Grapple With Workplace Violence," Management Review, 83, no. 3 ( 1994): 52.
3.
Eugene D. Wheeler and Baron S. Anthony, Violence in Our Schools, Hospitalsand Public Places

-167-

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New Arenas for Violence: Homicide in the American Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Murder in the Workplace 1
  • Notes 8
  • 2 - History of Occupational Homicide 9
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - Case Studies of Occupational Homicide 49
  • Notes 98
  • 4 - Violence Imperatives and Prevention Techniques 101
  • Notes 167
  • 5 - Conclusions and Recommendations 171
  • Appendix 181
  • Selected Bibliography 185
  • Index 189
  • About the Author 194
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