Aidos: The Psychology and Ethics of Honour and Shame in Ancient Greek Literature

By Douglas L. Cairns | Go to book overview

5
Euripides

Euripides offers the student of aidōs a range of occurrences which can only be paralleled by the Homeric poems. This is not simply a consequence of the fact that he survives in greater bulk than do the other tragedians, for even within individual plays aidōs and its relatives often occur with considerable frequency. The relative domesticity of setting in many of his plays means that Euripides is often as useful a source of sociological data on aidōs as is Homer, but in general the data which emerge regarding the contexts in which aidōs is at home rarely make a significant difference to the conclusions we have been able to glean from Homer and others. In the following, then, I have attempted to concentrate on that which is new, significant, or of great thematic importance in the interpretation of individual plays. Thus while I begin by discussing, in turn, self- and other-regarding uses of aidōs (and the ways in which these are inextricably linked) and conclude with a survey of passages which extol the value of aidōs, the most important sections of this chapter focus on new, retrospective usages of the verbs aideomai and aischunomai and their relationship to concepts of conscience (5.3), and on the place of aidōs in attitudes towards sex and sexuality (5.4), in which connection many interesting questions are raised by the Hippolytus in particular.


5.1. PERSONAL HONOUR AND STATUS

5.1.1. Aidōs in Battle

Concern for one's personal honour is a basic and pervasive motivating force in Euripidean drama, and is naturally prominent in the martial context. The competitive values of the Homeric poems remain in the forefront; victory is kalon, defeat aichron,1 and aidōs may still cause one

____________________
1
Supp.529-30; cf. the Iliadic exhortation to avoid aichunē (disgrace) at Hcld839-40.

The reference to the polis here indicates that the community which gives rise to sentiments of collective honour is different from that in Homer, but otherwise the ideas

-265-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aidos: The Psychology and Ethics of Honour and Shame in Ancient Greek Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • I - Aidōs in Homer 48
  • 2 - From Hesiod to the Fifth Century 147
  • 3 - Aeschylus 178
  • 4 - Sophocles 215
  • 5 - Euripides 265
  • 6 - The Sophists, Plato, and Aristotle 343
  • Epilogue 432
  • References 435
  • Index of Principal Passages 459
  • General Index 472
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 484

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.