Contemporary Arab Politics: a Concise History

By George E. Kirk | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
JORDANIA PHOENIX

The position of Glubb Pasha (afterwards Sir John Bagot Glubb) as Chief of Staff of the Jordanian Army had naturally long been obnoxious to Arab nationalists, both civilian and military. 1 The defection to the Egyptians of Lt. Col. Abdullah at-Tall, his accusation that King Abdullah and Glubb had jointly betrayed the Arab cause to the Israelis during the Palestine War, and at-Tall's probable complicity in the murder of King Abdullah in 1951 were, according to Glubb, a consequence of Glubb's unwillingness to approve his further accelerated promotion. 2 Later, young King Husain, after his accession to the throne, had in 1954 been introduced to the night life of Paris by Ali Abu Nuwar, a young officer and member of the Syrian Ba'th Party who had been appointed Jordanian Military Attaché to France to get him out of the way after his rash political talk had been reported. 3 In the fall of 1955, the young King had insisted on appointing Abu Nuwar as his chief aide-de-camp. That winter, the nationalist and left-wing forces in Jordan, egged on by Egyptian propaganda 4 and Saudi gold, held violent and destructive demonstrations when it was rumored that Jordan would join the Baghdad Pact. 5 The young King had considered such a move

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Contemporary Arab Politics: a Concise History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter 1 the Myth of the Fourteenth Muslim Century 13
  • Chapter 2 the Sapping of the Seven Pillars 21
  • Chapter 3 the Free Officers Lose Their Freedom 29
  • Chapter 4 the Great Divorce 45
  • Chapter 5 the Smothering of Syria 91
  • Chapter 6 Jordania Phoenix 107
  • Chapter 7 the Lebanese Civil War 113
  • Chapter 8 Iraq Reverts to Type 137
  • Chapter 9 Abdel Nasser at Damascus-- or the New Saint Paul 149
  • Conclusion 173
  • Appendix the Egyptian Land Reform 177
  • Notes *
  • Recommended Reading *
  • Index *
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