Contemporary Arab Politics: a Concise History

By George E. Kirk | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
THE EGYPTIAN LAND REFORM
The program of land reform undertaken by the Egyptian revolutionary regime from September, 1952, onward consisted of three initial reforms and two supplementary but essential developments:
1. The maximum permissible holding was fixed at 200 faddān (a faddān is approximately one acre), with an additional 50 faddān allowed for each of two sons of the landowner. The surplus was to be expropriated, with compensation payable in government bonds in the value of 70 times the annual tax assessment of the area expropriated. As successive governments favorable to the landowning interest had for two decades allowed the land tax to remain virtually constant while land values had been sharply rising, the state was thus at last recouping itself for this legalized fraud upon it. The land thus expropriated, as well as that seized from members of the "former royal family" without compensation, was to be allotted to landless peasant families in lots of three to five faddān, and each former estate or other appropriate unit would be under the direction of a cooperative committee which would include representatives of the Ministries of Agriculture and Social Affairs. It was admitted that the land thus available

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Contemporary Arab Politics: a Concise History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter 1 the Myth of the Fourteenth Muslim Century 13
  • Chapter 2 the Sapping of the Seven Pillars 21
  • Chapter 3 the Free Officers Lose Their Freedom 29
  • Chapter 4 the Great Divorce 45
  • Chapter 5 the Smothering of Syria 91
  • Chapter 6 Jordania Phoenix 107
  • Chapter 7 the Lebanese Civil War 113
  • Chapter 8 Iraq Reverts to Type 137
  • Chapter 9 Abdel Nasser at Damascus-- or the New Saint Paul 149
  • Conclusion 173
  • Appendix the Egyptian Land Reform 177
  • Notes *
  • Recommended Reading *
  • Index *
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