The Antiquities of Constantinople

By Pierre Gilles; Ronald G. Musto et al. | Go to book overview

TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE

IT IS CUSTOMARY UPON A TRANSLATION TO GIVE SOME account both of the author and his writings. The author, Petrus Gyllius, as he stands enrolled among the men of eminency, and figure in polite learning, I find to be a native of Abi in France. He was in great reputation in the Sixteenth Century and was looked upon as a writer of so good a taste, and so comprehensive a genius, that there was scarce anything in the polite languages, which had escaped him. As he had a particular regard of men of distinguished learning, so was he equally honoured and esteemed by them. Francis, the First, king of France, the great patron of literature, and who was also a good judge of his abilities, sent him into Italy, and Greece, to make a collection of all the choice manuscripts which had never been printed, but in his passage it was his misfortune to be taken by the Corsairs. Some time after, by the application and generosity of Cardinal d'Armanac, he was redeemed from slavery. The just sense this munificent patron had of his merit, incited him, when my author had finished more than forty years travels over all Greece, Asia, and the greatest part of Africa, in the search of antiquities to receive him into his friendship, and family; where, while he was digesting, and methodizing his labours for the service of the public, he died in the year 1555, and in the sixty-fifth year of his age.

Although it was his intention to have published all the learned observations he had made in his travels, yet he lived to give us only a description of the Bosporus,

-xxxiii-

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The Antiquities of Constantinople
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxix
  • Translator's Preface xxxiii
  • Author's Preface xxxvii
  • Book One 1
  • Book Two 51
  • Book III 125
  • Book IV 169
  • Glossary 225
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 239
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