The Antiquities of Constantinople

By Pierre Gilles; John Ball et al. | Go to book overview

BOOK IV

I
The Eleventh Ward,
The Fourth and Fifth Hills

I HAD BEEN AT A LOSS TO DISCOVER THE ELEVENTH ward, though the Ancient Description of the Wards mentions it to have been wider in compass than the tenth and in no part bounded by the sea. It also says that it partly consisted of level and partly of rising ground. The author added, however, that it also contained the Church of the Apostles. Though nothing now remains of that church, I was informed by some elderly people of Constantinople who told me that they remembered that it stood on the back of the fourth hill, which fell on a hill of the third valley near the Saddlers Shops and the sepulcher of Emperor Mohamet. I observe from this that the eleventh ward was partly on the top of the same hill and partly on its north side.

I shall show by what follows that this ward reached the Land Wall of the city, which divided the eleventh from the fourteenth ward, and which was also itself divided from the city by an intermediate space of land. I shall convince the reader presently that this ward was situated on the sixth hill outside the walls of the city and was afterward walled around by Theodosius II.

The walls built by Constantine are said to have reached as far as the churches of St. Anthony and St. Mary, who

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Antiquities of Constantinople
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxix
  • Translator's Preface xxxiii
  • Author's Preface xxxvii
  • Book One 1
  • Book Two 51
  • Book III 125
  • Book IV 169
  • Glossary 225
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 239
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.