The Feudal Kingdom of England, 1042-1216

By Frank Barlow | Go to book overview

9
THE ANGEVIN EMPIRE

I

THE Angevin empire did not outlast Henry II and his sons. A personal accumulation of fiefs could be no stronger than the family which united the parts; and the domestic feuds which rent Henry's house undid its strength. In the beginning the family power seemed without measure. 'The wealth of the king of the Indians is in precious stones, lions, pards, and elephants. The emperor of Constantinople and the king of Sicily glory in gold and silk, only their men are empty boasters. The emperor of the Germans has many soldiers but no riches or splendour, for Charlemagne gave it all to the church. But your king', said Louis VII of France to Walter Map, 'the lord of England, who wants for nothing, has men and horses, gold and silk and jewels, and fruits, game, and everything else, while we in France have nothing but bread and wine and gaiety.'

Yet, according to contemporaries, there was a canker in the Angevin tree. Gerald of Barri in a savage chapter of his De principis instructione (On the education of princes) laid bare the worm. Henry fitzEmpress, he observed, was of rotten stock bred from a witch. He had married a bigamist who had been his father's mistress. He had debauched his son's betrothed. Like his father he had oppressed the church. Small wonder that his son, Richard I, jested that from the devil they came and to the devil they would return. So wrote the moralist reflecting on the misery and misfortune of the proud. And even the great king himself, as though oppressed by the doom, uttered wild blasphemies while his cruel son hunted him to his death. But the problem of keeping adult sons in a long and contented pupillage -- familiar to all hereditary societies -- was

-331-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Feudal Kingdom of England, 1042-1216
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introductory Note v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Maps and Charts xii
  • I - England in the Reign of Edward the Confessor 1
  • 2 - The Reign of Edward the Confessor 55
  • 3 - The Norman Conquest of England 77
  • 4 - The Anglo-Norman Kingdom 100
  • 5 England and Normandy, 1066-1100 137
  • 6 - The Zenith and the Nadir of Norman Rule, 1100-1154 171
  • 7 - Social Changes in England 235
  • 8 - The Re-Establishment of the Monarchy Under Henry II 283
  • 9 - The Angevin Empire 331
  • 10 - The Angevin Despotism 375
  • Epilogue 436
  • Note on Books 442
  • Index 445
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 465

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.