A Source-Book on French Law: Public Law--Constitutional and Administrative Law : Private Law--Structure, Contract

By Kahn-Freund; Lévy et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

REVIEWERS of the last edition, though kindly, were agreed on one thing: that it was too difficult. In an attempt to meet their criticisms, this edition has been completely revised, both in plan and in content.

It now begins with a fairly lengthy Introduction, largely in English and designed to explain to the student the necessary background and the crucial division of French law. That division is then followed in the rest of the book, which consists of extracts in the original French usually prefaced by observations in English. The first Part deals with public law: its section on Constitutional Law sets out the major sources of, and the main controls in, this basic area. Its second section sketches the structure and domain of administrative law, while its last sub section tries to provide a fairly simple illustrative example. The second Part is devoted to private law. Its first section gives the basic texts on the field's categories, sources, and structure, illustrated by the contract materials in the second section.

Major alterations in the substance of the texts included were imposed by the legal and political developments which have occurred in France during the last decade. The Conseil constitutionnel -- an innovation of 1958 -- now bids fair to become a Supreme Court.1 It has kept the Parliament scrupulously within a Bill of Rights, and in doing so has been forced to reflect on the fundamental principles of the law of the Republic. Although the Parliamentary opposition has frequently referred legislation to the Conseil, hoping to attain by a lawsuit what it cannot achieve by a vote, the Conseil has acted with prudence and independence, setting fair limits around both the nationalizations of the early and the privatizations of the mid-1980s. For just over two years from March 1986 a socialist President had to live with (the French called it cohabitation) a non-socialist majority in the legislature. That Charles de Gaulle's Constitution stood the strain is -- at least to a lawyer -- in no small measure due to the Conseil constitutionnel.

____________________
1
For articles in English, see Barry Nicholas, "Fundamental Rights and Judicial Review in France", [ 1978] P.L. 82 and 155; John Bell, "Equality in the Case-law of the Conseil constitutionnel in France", [ 1987] P.L. 426; Cynthia Vroom, "Constitutional Protection of Individual Liberties in France: The Conseil constitutionnel since 1971", 63 Tul. L.R. 265 ( 1988) and works there cited.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Source-Book on French Law: Public Law--Constitutional and Administrative Law : Private Law--Structure, Contract
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Conventions xvii
  • Abbreviations xix
  • Table of French Statutes Etc. xxi
  • Table of French Cases xxiii
  • Table of English Statutes xxvii
  • Table of English Cases xxviii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I. Public Law 21
  • 1. Constitutional Law 23
  • 2. Administrative Law 119
  • Part Ii. Private Law 205
  • 3. Structure 206
  • Contract 298
  • Bibliography 516
  • Index 519
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 523

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.