Thucydides - Vol. 1

By Thucydides; Benjamin Jowett | Go to book overview

BOOK II

1 AND now the war between the Athenians and Peloponnesians and the allies of both actually began. Henceforward the struggle was uninterrupted, and they communicated with one another only by heralds. The narrative is arranged according to summers and winters and follows the order of events.

Outbreak of the war. B.C. 431. Ol. 87, 2.

2 For fourteen years the thirty years' peace which was concluded after the recovery of Euboea remained unbroken. But in the fifteenth year, when Chrysis the high-priestess of Argos was in the forty-eighth year of her priesthood, Aenesias being Ephor at Sparta, and at Athens Pythodorus having two months of his archonship to run a, in the sixth month after the engagement at Potidaea and at the beginning of spring, about the first watch of the night an armed force of somewhat more than three hundred Thebans entered Plataea, a city of Boeotia, which was an ally of Athens, under the command of two Boeotarchs, Pythangelus the son of Phyleides, and Diemporus the son of Onetorides. They were invited by Naucleides, a Plataean, and his partisans, who opened the gates to them. These men wanted to kill certain citizens of the opposite faction and to make over the city to the Thebans, in the hope of getting the power into their own hands. The intrigue had been conducted by Eurymachus the son of Leontiades,

The Thebans enter Plataea by night.

____________________
a
For the difficulties attending the chronology see note on the passage.

-102-

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Thucydides - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Note v
  • The Greatness of Thucydides vi
  • Contents vii
  • On Inscriptions of the Age of Thucydides viii
  • On Inscriptions of the Age of Thucydides ix
  • Note on the Geography of Thucydides cvi
  • Thucydides 1
  • Book II 102
  • Book III 184
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