Thucydides - Vol. 1

By Thucydides; Benjamin Jowett | Go to book overview

BOOK III

IN the following summer, when the corn was in full ear, the Peloponnesians and their allies, under the command of Archidamus, the son of Zeuxidamus, the Lacedaemonian king, invaded Attica, and encamping wasted the country. The Athenian cavalry as usual attacked them whenever an opportunity offered, and prevented the great body of the light-armed troops from going beyond their lines and injuring the lands near the city. The invaders remained until their supplies were exhausted; they were then disbanded, and returned to their several homes.

1 B.C. 428. O.88

Third invasion of Attica by the Peloponnesians.

No sooner had the Peloponnesians quitted Attica than the whole people of Lesbos, with the exception of the Methymnaeans, revolted from Athens. They had entertained the design before the war began, but the Lacedaemonians gave them no encouragement. And now they were not ready, and were compelled to revolt sooner than they had intended. For they were waiting until they had completed the work of closing their harbours, raising walls, and building ships, and they had not as yet received from Pontus the force of archers, the corn and the other supplies for which they had sent. But the inhabitants of Tenedos, who were not on good terms with them, and the Methymnaeans, and individual citizens who were of the opposite faction and

2

The Lesbians, with the exception of the Methymnaeans, revolt, but sooner than they had intended, information of their plans having been sent to Athens from Tenedos, Methymna, and Mytilenè itself.

-184-

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Thucydides - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Note v
  • The Greatness of Thucydides vi
  • Contents vii
  • On Inscriptions of the Age of Thucydides viii
  • On Inscriptions of the Age of Thucydides ix
  • Note on the Geography of Thucydides cvi
  • Thucydides 1
  • Book II 102
  • Book III 184
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