Design Motifs

By Saburō Mizoguchi; Louise Allison Cort | Go to book overview

4
Development of a Native Style
Heian Period (794-1185)

As the intensity of Japanese cultural borrowing from T'ang China diminished, partly as a result of the cessation of official embassies to the T'ang court, the all-pervading Chinese influence upon the arts gradually gave way to an increasingly original and unmistakably Japanese style. Heralding this new era was the transfer of the capital in 794 from Nara to Heian-kyō (modern Kyoto), specifically for the purpose of renewing the vitality of the country. The winds of change blew gently through the world of design as well, although some time was to pass before distinctly innovative motifs appeared. Thus, the early Heian period should be seen as a time of transition, during which design formats were still steeped in the Chinese inheritance from the Nara period but were beginning to evolve toward independent and more authentically Japanese forms of expression.


Designs of the Transitional Period

The design characteristics of the transitional period are clearly to be seen in the patterns that adorn the miniature shrine in the Mandala Hall of the Taimadera temple in Nara Prefecture. The shrine was made in 763 to house a tapestry representing the Paradise of Amida which is the chief object of worship in the temple. The surfaces of the shrine are decorated in gold and silver tempera with Nara-type motifs including kōsōge, butterflies, phoenixes, long-tailed birds, pheasants, ducks, sun and moon, and landscapes (Plate 34).

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Design Motifs
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 143

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.