Printing in Colonial Spanish America

By Hensley C. Woodbridge; Lawrence S. Thompson | Go to book overview

Chapter VIII
THE BEGINNING OF PRINTING IN
THE SPANISH ANTILLES

One might normally have assumed that printing would have followed the course of the empire in Spanish America and found its home in the Antilles. In reality some of the oldest settlements were among the most backward in acquiring presses. Santo Domingo and Panamá knew nothing of printing before the nineteenth century. It was not until 1807 that so ancient a Caribbean community as San Juan de Puerto Rico acquired a press. In the British Antilles and even in British Guiana printing was well established in the eighteenth century, expecially in Jamaica and Barbados. Life was perhaps a bit too easy in most of the islands to stimulate the cultivation of European crafts.

An exception was Cuba, the seat of a captain general and always the richest and most significant of the islands. The beginning of printing in Cuba has been clouded by unfounded rumor and slipshod research to which even such distinguished bibliographers as Beristain de Souza and Antonio Bachiller y Morales nave contributed.

Thus, Ambrosio Valiente, Tabla cronológica de los sucesos ocurridos en la ciudad de Santiago de Cuba1

-114-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Printing in Colonial Spanish America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents i
  • Preface ii
  • Illustrations iii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Notes 31
  • Chapter II: The Beginning of Printing in Peru 41
  • Chapter III Printing in the Reducciones of Old Paraguay 51
  • Notes 58
  • Chapter IV the Beginning of Printing in the Rio De La Plata Region 60
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter V Printing in Puebla and Central America in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries 78
  • Notes 87
  • Chapter VI the Beginning of Printing in the Viceroyalty of New Granada 91
  • Notes 103
  • Chapter VII the Beginning of Printing in Chile 106
  • Notes 109
  • Chapter VIII the Beginning of Printing in the Spanish Antilles 114
  • Notes 118
  • Personal Name Index 161
  • Short Title Index 167
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.