Foundations of Family Therapy: A Conceptual Framework for Systems Change

By Lynn Hoffman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A great many people were part of the long journey that resulted in this book. I want to express my appreciation to Don Bloch, Director of the Ackerman Institute, who very generously bestowed on me an unofficial grant, by giving me the space and time to complete the manuscript. At the Ackerman Institute, an atmosphere of collegial and creative enterprise was provided by Olga Silverstein and Peggy Papp, of the Brief Therapy Project, and by members of my current research team, Gillian Walker, Peggy Penn, John Patten, Joel Bergman, and Jeffrey Ross. I owe many of my ideas to the stimulating discussions I have had with these important colleagues.

Peggy Penn and Carl Bryant read early drafts of the manuscript and offered sound advice and enormous encouragement, for which I am most grateful. At a later stage, the manuscript was carefully read by Paul Dell and Carlos Sluzki, whose excellent suggestions are incorporated into the text.

As for colleagues less involved in the final process but whose intellectual energy and personal support constituted an invaluable contribution, I would like to thank Mara Selvini Palazzoli and her associates in Milan, Giuliana Prata, Luigi Boscolo, and Gianfranco Cecchin, who have given me unfailing encouragement. I am also most grateful to other colleagues, who have taught me, inspired me, and believed in me: among these are the late Don Jackson, Virginia Satir, Jay Haley, Dick Auerswald, Salvador Minuchin, Harry Aponte, Carl Whitaker, Monica McGoldrick, Carrell Damman, and Harry Goolishian.

For understanding and appreciating my work and helping make it known to colleagues in England and Europe, I am indebted to John

-ix-

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