The Life and Adventures of Mr. Duncan Campbell: In One Volume. to Which Are Added, the Dumb Philosopher; and Everybody's Business Is Nobody's Business

By Daniel Defoe | Go to book overview

CHAP. IV.
Young Duncan Campbell returns with his mother to Edinburgh. The earl of Argyle's overthrow. The ruin of Mr. Archibald Campbell and his death. Young Duncan's practice in prediction at Edinburgh while yet a boy.

OUR young boy, now between six and seven years of age, half a Highlander and half a Laplander, delighted in wearing a little bonnet and plaid, thinking it looked very manly in his countrymen; and his father, as soon as he was out of his hanging sleeves, and left off his boy's vest, indulged him with that kind of dress, which is truly antique and heroic. In this early part of his nonage he was brought to Edinburgh by his mother-in-law, where I myself grew afresh acquainted with her, his father being then but lately dead. Just after the civil commotion, and off and on, have known him ever since, and conversed with him very frequently during that space of time, which, now is about three or four-and- thirty years, so that whatever I say concerning him in the future pages, I shall relate to the reader from my own certain knowledge, which, as I resolve to continue anonymous, may perhaps not have so much weight and authority as if I had prefixed my name to the account. Be that as it will, there are hundreds of living witnesses that will justify each action I relate, and his own future actions while he lives will procure belief and credit to the precedent ones which I am going to record; so that if many

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