Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Forearm Muscular Fatigue during 4 Hours of
Intensive Computer Mouse Work
-- Relation to Age.

Jensen B.R., Laursen, B. and Ratkevicius, A.* Department of Physiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. * NMR-Center, Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark


1
Introduction

Muscles undergo a whole variety of morphological and neurological changes with age. A reduction in muscle cross-sectional area, a decrease in total number of motor units, an increase in average motor unit size and a general slowing of skeletal muscles have been reported in aging humans (e.g. Grimby and Saltin 1983; Davis, Thomas and White 1986). The precision of force exertions also appears to decrease with age (e.g. Cole 1991; Galganski, Fuglevand and Enoka 1993). However, it remains unclear if these age-related changes in neuromuscular function affect the performance of computer work. Reports on age related changes in muscle fatigue resistance are contradictory (e.g. Davis, Thomas and White 1986; Klein, Cunningham Paterson and Taylor 1988). Thus, it is even less clear if aging contributes to muscle fatigue during intensive computer mouse work performed for prolonged periods of time.

The aim was to investigate to which extent 4 hours of intensive computer mouse work elicited electromyographical signs of muscle fatigue in young and elderly subjects. Furthermore, to study if development of muscle fatigue is related to work intensity in terms of number of mouse clicks per unit of time.


2
Method

Eight young (25 years, range 22-28 years) and nine elderly (63 years, range 5670 years) experienced female computer users participated in the study. They performed four 50-min sessions of intensive computer mouse work. The sessions were separated by 10-min breaks. The subjects performed a combination of computer mouse tests and electronic painting. The computer mouse test was performed in the beginning of the first session and at the end of

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.