Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

The Effects of Representational Bias on Collaborative Inquiry

Daniel D. Suthers Department of Information and Computer Sciences University of Hawai'i at Manoa 1680 East West Road POST 303A Honolulu HI 96822 suthers@hawaii.edu


1
Introduction

For a number of years, the author and his colleagues (see acknowledgments) have been building, testing, and refining a diagrammatic environment intended to support secondary school children's learning of critical inquiry skills in the context of science ( Suthers et al. 1997). During this time, a refocus on collaborative learning led to a major change in how we viewed the role of the interface representations. Rather than being a medium of communication or a formal record of the argumentation process, we came to view the representations as resources for conversation ( Roschelle 1994).

These observations, coupled with the fact that other projects with similar goals were using radically different representational systems, led the author to propose a more systematic study of the ways in which these different representational systems can influence collaborative learning discourse. The differences in representational notations that are provided by existing software for critical inquiry are striking. The range includes hypertext/hypermedia systems ( Guzdial et al. 1997, O'Neill & Gomez 1994, Scardamalia et al. 1992), argument mapping environments ( Ranney et al. 1995, Smolensky et al. 1987, Suthers el al. 1997), containment representations ( Bell 1997), and matrices ( Puntambekar et al. 1997). Yet there is a lack of systematic studies comparing the effects of external representations on collaborative learning discourse. Given that these representations define the fundamental character of software intended to guide learning, a systematic comparison is overdue.

Substantial research has been conducted concerning the role of external representations in individual problem solving, generally showing that the kind

-362-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.