Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

3-D Input Device using a Ball Rotation Interface
Tomoichi Takahashi Mikio Kuzuya
Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 JAPAN
1
INTRODUCTION
This paper presents a new compact three-dimensional (3-D) input device. Typical 2-D input devices, such as mouses or trackballs, can input movements of two degrees of freedom (DoF) and cannot handle 3-D with six DoF at the same time. The more programs, such as computer-aided design systems and virtual reality systems, support 3-D presentation, the more a handy 3-D input device has been required ( Balaguer and Gobbetti, 1996) ( Vince 1995).The PolhemusTm magnetic position and orientation sensor, the LogitecTm sonic sensor, and the SPACEBALLTM are well known devices. These 3-D input devices can directly input 3-D movement and have a more natural interface than 2-D input devices. However, they have some problems. Magnetic sensors or sonic sensors are influenced by environmental conditions and tire the operators who hold them in the air. SPACEBALLTM solves this holding problem. But, it is difficult to input spiral movement, which is composed of rotational and translation movements. Mechanical link type devices have singular postures where the number of device's DoF is reduced.Our aim is to produce a 3-D input device which can be used beside a computer in daily life. A good 3-D manipulation interface must provide a natural way to input 3-D motion as well as support an appropriate response. A good 3-D pointing device should
1. input 3-D motion in natural ways analogous to real life,
2. respond effectively in noisy environments,
3. change operation modes smoothly, and
4. provide feedback to the operator from the computer.

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