Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Empirical data on the use of speech and gestures
in a multimodal human-computer environment
Noëlle Carbonell†, Pierre Dauchy‡
† LORIA, Campus Scientifique, BP 239
F54506 Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France
tel.: +33 (0)3 83 59 20 32, fax: +33 (0)3 83 41 30 79
e-mail: Noelle. Carbonell @ loria. fr‡ IMASSA-CERMA, BP 73, F91223 Brétigny sur Orge Cedex, France
tel.: +33 (0)1 69 88 33 69, fax: +33 (0)1 69 88 33 02, e-mail: pdauchy@imassa.fr
1
Context, motivations and objectives
Thanks to recent advances in automatic speech recognition and natural language processing, it is now possible to consider the integration of speech into user interfaces for the general public. Speech controlled human-computer interaction (HCI) will prove useful in contexts where the use of keyboard and mouse is awkward or impossible, such as home automation, online services, pocket devices, road navigation, etc.In addition, speech associated with 2D gestures can provide an attractive alternative to direct manipulation in these and many other contexts of use, since:
-- robust multimodal1 HCI can now be achieved; present continuous speech decoders are capable of processing accurately large subsets of natural language; 2D designation gestures, which can also be interpreted reliably, may be used for expressing references to graphical objects or locations on the screen, thus making up for the present limitations of natural language interpreters as regards spatial linguistic references;
-- spoken natural language associated with gestures on a touch screen seems more straightforward, hence usable, than direct manipulation (cf. menu selection through the mouse); in addition, designation gestures can be readily linked to utterances thanks to deictics (cf. "here/there", "this", etc.).
____________________
1
Throughout the paper "multimodal" and "multimodality" refer to the combined use of speech and gestures for interacting with software.

-446-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.