Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Cultural Differences in Icon Recognition

Rungtai Lin

Department of Industrial Design

Mingchi Institute of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan

Email: rtlin@.ccsun.mit.edu.tw


1
Introduction

Along with the increasing availability of high quality graphic displays, the use of iconic interfaces in computer system is becoming common and accessible to users. Many users have come to view an iconic interface as a requirement for their systems and software. While icons are playing an increasingly important role in iconic interface, many cognitive human factors of icon design are not well understood ( Gittins 1986, Lodding 1982). There are no specific set of rules or criteria that can be followed by the designers during the design stage. Although the International Organization for Standardization ( Easterby and Zwaga 1976) provides the selection criteria and original reference principles, whether an icon has met the criteria can be known only after the test is completed. For icons are effective in an iconic interface, they need to be properly designed to be meaningful, associated, learnable, memorable and consistent. Collins ( 1982) listed six questions to evaluate an icon, including 1)Can the symbol be detected? 2) Can it be discriminated from all others? 3) Can it be recognized when seen in a different context? 4) Does it communicate the intended meaning? 5) Does it gain attention? 6) Does it alter behavior appropriately? This six questions can be grouped into the four categories of human factors which are physical, cognitive, social, and cultural. Cultural factors are the vaguest and the most unspecific, the least known, the most difficult to codify, but perhaps, precisely because of these reasons are the most important. Recently, the research in this field has been focusing on "cultural differences in the user perception" ( Resnick et al. 1997) with an attempt to study the influence of culture in icon recognition. Therefore, the purpose of this paper intended to study the cultural factors in the preferences of pictorial symbols.

-725-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.