Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

A use scenario provides a representation of an effective user performance, thus making it more likely that ineffective dialogue steps cannot be failed to notice. In other words, the final use scenario is a success story about the prototype. It is validated by the user and accompanied by a list of usability requirements. Hence, the virtue of use scenarios in the prototyping process is its communicativeness for all parties involved. Even managers can be satisfied with this kind of documentation, since the final use scenario represents the agreed upon understanding in the design team, including the users. Use scenarios turned out to be indispensable in evolving a consensus among user and designer and for validating requirements as well.

Use scenarios also serve as product documents of prototypes. Monk ( 1998) recommends to include other documents with a scenario, e.g., photocopies of real work objects, screen dumps, commented design decisions, flow charts, and so on. The primary purpose of amending the scenario is to represent the scenario in ways that can be communicated easily to the different members (roles) of the design team ( McGraw and Harbison, 1997). For instance, scenarios can serve as a valuable source for any kind of user documentation.


Conclusion

A user being confronted with a prototype may be overwhelmed with design details. Use scenarios can help the user to restructure this information in more familiar terms which is the user's task performance, thereby producing a representation complementary to the system behaviour Double representation of a prototype in terms of use scenarios did not turn out as waste of effort but as a means to improve an understanding of requirements and design.


References

ISO 8402 ( 1994). Quality management and quality assurance -- Vocabulary.

Klix, F. Ed. ( 1979). Human and artificial intelligence. Amsterdam: NorthHolland.

McGraw, K. L. and Harbison, K. ( 1997). User-Centered Requirements: The Scenario-Based Engineering Process. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Newman, W. M. and Lamming, M. G. ( 1995). Interactive System Design.. Wokingham: Addison-Wesley.

Weidenhaupt, K., Pohl, K., Jarke, M., and Haumer, P. ( 1998). Scenarios in system development: Current practice. IEEE Software, March/April, 34-45.

Winograd, T. and Flores, F. ( 1986). Understanding Computers and Cognition

-- A New Foundation for Design. Norwood, N,J.: Ablex.

Monk, A. ( 1998). Lightweight Techniques to Encourage Innovative User Interface Design. In: Wood, L. E. (ed.): User Interface Design. Bridging the Gap from User Requirements to Design. Boca Raton: CRC Press.

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