For the Defense of Themselves and the State: The Original Intent and Judicial Interpretation of the Right to Keep and Bear Arms

By Clayton E. Cramer | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The volume before you now represents not only my work, but also the help, suggestions, and legwork of many others, without whose assistance it would not have come together in its present form. Professor Daniel Markwyn's suggestions and pointers to primary sources have been invaluable in bringing together the rich variety of materials in the original intent chapters; even more important was his encouragement to tackle a task that was larger than either of us realized.

The process of locating up to date case law citations for the various states was a major undertaking; without the assistance of my many correspondents around the United States, this task would have been far more expensive in time and money. The following have been of assistance in locating these indispensable starting points for legal research: Kirk Webb ( Colorado); Michael Plowinske ( New York & Vermont); David Robinson ( Tennessee); Spencer Garrett ( Washington); Dave Chesler ( Massachusetts); Joseph McConnell ( Michigan); Mike Rose ( Maryland); John Donahue ( Maine); and Drew Betz ( Ohio). Professor Joseph St. Sauver at the University of Oregon, Professor Preston Covey at Carnegie-Mellon University, and Jack Schudel, were kind enough to send me recent revisions to the Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Florida concealed weapons permit laws; Donald Newcomb sent me the National Firearms Act hearings. Andy Freeman provided me with Marcus Kavanagh's The Criminal and His Allies. Similarly, Wayne Warf's provision of Andrew Fletcher's works concerning the militia was much appreciated.

My colleagues Allan Clarke and Ron Kennemer looked over the manuscript at an early stage, and made useful suggestions. My wife Rhonda provided substantial assistance in locating information relating to slavery, civil rights, and racial fear, in addition to reviewing and thoroughly critiquing not only the writing, but also the organizational scheme of this book, and then assisting me in the grueling task of cutting it down to its current size. As the book reached its final form, Chris Hansen made a number of useful grammatical and stylistic suggestions. My children Hilary and James have, with good humor, accepted that all their father's spare time would be lost for a year.

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
For the Defense of Themselves and the State: The Original Intent and Judicial Interpretation of the Right to Keep and Bear Arms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgment xvii
  • I. Definitions 1
  • II. European Origins 19
  • III. The Legislative History of the Second Amendment 31
  • IV. Problems of Judicial Interpretation 63
  • V. "To Keep and Carry Arms Wherever They Went" 69
  • VI. "No Negro. . . Shall Be Allowed to Carry Fire-Arms" 97
  • VII. "Carrying Concealed Weapons is a Grievous Evil" 141
  • VIII. "A Proper Reason for Carrying a Pistol" 165
  • IX. Civil Rights, Civil Disturbances 197
  • X. The Right Comes Out of Its Coma? 221
  • XI. At the Crossroads 269
  • Selected Bibliography 275
  • Index 281
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.