The Pride of Havana: A History of Cuban Baseball

By Roberto González Echevarría | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Accustomed to dealing mostly with written texts in my work as a literary critic and historian, researching The Pride of Havana often took me instead to people, not a few of whom eagerly volunteered to assist as soon as they found out my topic, which was so close to their hearts. I suspect that most would have liked to have been the ones writing the book; ironically they were, without knowing it. Though every single one of those I interviewed (complete list in Bibliography) lent precious assistance, a few deserve special mention. I recorded two long conversations with Agapito Mayor, but we talked many other times over lunch or on the telephone. He also put at my disposal two large boxes of clippings and memorabilia that he allowed me to take home to rummage through at my leisure. He was my chief informant. Rodolfo Fernández I interviewed on tape in the early stages of research and several other times informally and via the telephone as I learned more about the subject. He was like a patient, wise teacher making suggestions, pointing out promising leads, and tactfully correcting mistakes. Rodolfo also sent me magazines, pictures, and clippings, and maintained with me a lively correspondence in his impeccable Spanish and enviable handwriting. Rocky and Alberta Nelson received me enthusiastically in Portsmouth, Ohio, and allowed me to cart away yet another box of clippings and memorabilia that I was able to sift through and copy at home. I

-ix-

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The Pride of Havana: A History of Cuban Baseball
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • First Pitch 3
  • The Last Game 14
  • From a House Divided to a Full House 44
  • A Cuban Belle Époque 75
  • The Golden Age 112
  • The Great Amateur Era 189
  • The Revival of the Cuban League 252
  • The Age of Gold 298
  • Baseball and Revolution 352
  • Notes 407
  • Bibliography 423
  • Index 441
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