The Pride of Havana: A History of Cuban Baseball

By Roberto González Echevarría | Go to book overview
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E

























The Last Game

"Who is the greatest manager, really, Luque or
Mike González?"
"I think they are equal."
-- Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

Dawn was cool and bright in Havana on Tuesday, February 25, 1947. A brisk wind whipped away the high clouds remaining from yesterday's rains as a golden glow began to unveil the skyline of the city. Newspaper vendors broke the silence with their cries, and bottles clinked on sidewalks and in doorways as milkmen completed their rounds. The rumble of buses and the clanging of streetcars were just beginning. Soon, as if driven by a sudden migratory urge, thousands would board them, joining others on foot and in cars. The thousands would head to the Gran Stadium de la Habana, the new baseball park built not far from downtown, to the south. The most dramatic ending in the nearly seventy-year history of the Cuban League was about to take place that afternoon, in a contest that -- no one knew it then -- would be the most important baseball game yet played on the island, perhaps the last of such portent.

In Santos Suárez, a middle-class suburb of Havana developed mostly in the twenties in a style reminiscent of California, a man of thirty got up

-14-

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The Pride of Havana: A History of Cuban Baseball
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • First Pitch 3
  • The Last Game 14
  • From a House Divided to a Full House 44
  • A Cuban Belle Époque 75
  • The Golden Age 112
  • The Great Amateur Era 189
  • The Revival of the Cuban League 252
  • The Age of Gold 298
  • Baseball and Revolution 352
  • Notes 407
  • Bibliography 423
  • Index 441
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