How Women Executives Succeed: Lessons and Experiences from the Federal Government

By Danity Little | Go to book overview

Preface

If you can dream it, you can do it.

Walt Disney

Through generations, women have dreamed, suffered, worked, planned, waited, struggled, sacrificed, and survived to contribute to the grand design of having an equal part in our society--our democracy. Today a revolution is underway. Women are taking a journey through the ranks of government. Some are making it to their final destination--a journey to the top ranks of management in the public service--the Senior Executive Service (SES). What has made the difference for them in their career progress?

This book, based on a study of 78 federal senior executive women, examines that question. It is the first systematically researched and documented study of women who have broken the "glass ceiling" in the federal government. These women--at some risk to their own careers--have shared their experiences and the lessons learned that made the ceiling open up to them. Great care has been taken to ensure their own words were used to describe their lessons, experiences, and challenges. From their stories--and their stories needed to be told-- every woman who aspires to make it to the top can learn and understand what it takes to be an executive leader.

I hope that any woman in the work force, now and in the future, will be able to use this research to make it to the top. From this research, I know each woman will be able to learn what is happening in her own career and to identify where she is in the journey. She will be able to learn the lessons that are required for her to keep moving and to take action to bring her to her destination: the top.

-xi-

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How Women Executives Succeed: Lessons and Experiences from the Federal Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 5- The Experiences 67
  • Appendix A: Survey Questionnaire 165
  • Selected Bibliography 181
  • Index 187
  • About the Author *
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