How Women Executives Succeed: Lessons and Experiences from the Federal Government

By Danity Little | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Through the courage and support of so many people who care about other women making it to the top, this book is made possible.

I am grateful to the 78 senior executive women who took time from their busy lives to tell their stories so others may learn from their experiences. Their candor in talking about their career development and growth, setbacks, successes, failures, feelings, and beliefs and the generosity with which they gave of their time made this book a reality.

I am also grateful to the Center for Creative Leadership for support and encouragement. I extend to the center special thanks for permission to use their questionnaire, their enthusiasm to replicate their private-sector study on women in the federal government, and the access they gave me to some of the original data important to this research. My heartfelt thanks go to Randall White for his clear thinking, his research methodology, his ideas, and his inspiration to me as I struggled through the data collection and analysis stages of research. He has been a source of strength, support, and friendship.

For the many women in the federal government who encouraged me to write a book so that the research would not just sit on a shelf--Alma Shea, Joan Wrangler, Diane Sutton, Ellen Roderick, Mary Ann Jacob, Jeanne Ramos, Karin Alvarez, Belinda Zamer, and Margaret Patch--I thank you all.

In various stages of writing the manuscript, seven top-notch professionals gave their time and effort to read, edit, and make suggestions for improvements. Each was dedicated to making the book a helpful guide to assist women in breaking through the glass ceiling. They are JoAnn Vaught, Jean Palmer, Mary Ann Ruth, Helga Buerger, Mary Joe Hall, Vivian Havian, and Carol Jorgensen. I thank you all.

Three people deserve special recognition for their contribution in making this book publishable. JoAnn Vaught was a great source of energy and enthusiasm to

-xiii-

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How Women Executives Succeed: Lessons and Experiences from the Federal Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 5- The Experiences 67
  • Appendix A: Survey Questionnaire 165
  • Selected Bibliography 181
  • Index 187
  • About the Author *
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