Eastern Europe in the Sixties

By Stephen Fischer-Galati | Go to book overview

8. EASTERN EUROPE AND THE NON-COMMUNIST WORLD

HANS E. TÜTSCH

The relations between the Communist states of East Central and Southeastern Europe and the non-Communist world cannot be considered separately from their connections with the Soviet Union; while the links to the West are tenuous, like the web of a spider, the Communist countries are bound to Moscow by iron chains. Stalin, with the tacit or open consent of his wartime allies, built up his own "Continental system" by absorbing the Baltic states, together with territories torn off from Finland, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Rumania, into the Soviet Union, and by creating further a ring of satellites on its western borders reaching far into the center and south of Europe. He thus formed a hard core from which revolutionary Communism could spread all over the world.

Khrushchev is expanding this plan by attempting to shield the Soviet empire with a large zone of neutralist states in Europe, Asia, and Africa, over which the Russian hegemony can be established and which in time may be taken over by Communism. While Moscow is not yet in a position to dictate to the neutralist countries, their leaders are following the Kremlin's line more and more, whereas ten years ago, in the pre-Bandung era, Burma, Ceylon, India, Naguib's Egypt, and even Yugoslavia, which signed the Balkan Pact, leaned more toward the West. In its relationship to the neutralists, the Soviet Union uses the East European Communist states as an instrument for their political infiltration. The relations between the Soviet Union and the Communist states, between Moscow and the West, remain outside the scope of this article; therefore, the centripetal and centrifugal forces in the

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Eastern Europe in the Sixties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editor's Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Part One - The New Social Order 1
  • 2. Education for Communism 26
  • Part Two - The Planned Economy 53
  • 4. Industry and Labor 82
  • 5. New Patterns of Trade 120
  • Part Three - The Politics of Peaceful Coexistence 157
  • 7- Eastern Europe and World Communism 195
  • 8- Eastern Europe And The Non-Communist World 212
  • Notes 231
  • The Contributors 241
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