Agricola and Roman Britain

By Andrew Robert Burn | Go to book overview

Chapter Two
School at Marseilles, and News from Britain (A.D. 43-60)

NOT long after, in the interests of Agricola's education and doubtless also to escape from painful associations, Julia moved to Marseilles.

Marseilles ( Massilia to the Romans) was already an ancient town. For over six hundred years its temples and fortress walls had crowned the citadel above its harbour-- ever since the bold Greek sailors of Phokaia in Asia Minor had made their way here in search of silver and tin, and one of their young leaders had married a Celtic or pre- Celtic king's daughter and founded the settlement. A long and brilliant history had followed. Holding her own with her fleet against Phœnician Carthage, though at one time almost cut off from the Greek world, Massilia had survived, grown and prospered, spreading her daughter colonies along the coast from Spain to the wild Riviera, where the name of Nice ( Nicæa, "the Victorious") commemorates a success perhaps against the Etruscans. Government was in the hands of a prudent oligarchy, which knew better than to misgovern its workmen and sailors: a Council of Six Hundred land-owners, merchants and bankers and an executive "cabinet" of fifteen. Spanish silver came in through Ampurias, "the emporium"; tin through the native fortress of Enserune near Béziers, which grew rich on the proceeds--just where the Canal du Midi, the earliest great canal of modern Europe, now starts its journey to the Atlantic by the primeval route through Narbonne and Carcassonne.

As to where the tin came from, that long remained a secret. Rumours spoke of Tin Islands somewhere in the

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Agricola and Roman Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 186

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.