Agricola and Roman Britain

By Andrew Robert Burn | Go to book overview

Chapter Five
Life under Nero (A.D. 62-68)

BACK in Rome, Agricola next served his twelve-months' apprenticeship to administrative or judicial work in the capital.1 Twenty young future senators every year served this apprenticeship: three in the mint (this was considered the best post, and was often followed by quick promotion); four in charge of repair and maintenance of the streets of Rome; three in the macabre post of supervisors of executions (it would not bother a Roman); and ten as junior judicial officials. The work was not crushing, and there was plenty of time for social life such as would come the way of an agreeable young administrative official, who was also Græcinus' son and had the prestige, in an age which held its wars at decent intervals and at a safe distance, of a returned hero from Britain. Agricola, indeed, certainly was paying much attention to his private affairs during this year; before the summer was over he was married. Julia Procilla doubtless came to Rome for the wedding. After it, like a perfect mother-in-law, she retired to live her own life at her home at Ventimiglia.

Roman marriages were often a matter of family arrangement; especially first marriages, which were by no means always the last. But love-matches were not unknown, and both they and the family-arrangement type often settled down to devoted and lifelong partnerships. Naturally one hears most in literature about those which broke up with the most éclat; but thousands of tombstones of the Roman empire, of folk great or obscure, tell a different story. Agri-

____________________
1
In a later generation this would have been done before his military service, but under the early empire the order varied; and this is perhaps the point at which this post, not mentioned by Tacitus, fits best into his narrative.

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Agricola and Roman Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 186

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.