Agricola and Roman Britain

By Andrew Robert Burn | Go to book overview

Chapter Ten
The Advance to the North

AS the spring of 79 approached, Agricola and his legion- commanders were completing their plans for the great sweep northwards. "When summer came", says Tacitus, "and the army was concentrated, he was present everywhere on the line of march, complimenting good discipline, checking stragglers. He personally selected camp-sites, he personally reconnoitred estuaries and forests"--the places where ambushes might most easily be laid. "Meanwhile", continues the narrative, "he gave the enemy no rest from the raids of his flying columns, and then, when he had sufficiently terrorised them, he would pardon their resistance [!] and hold before their eyes the attractions of peace. Under these inducements many states, which had hitherto treated [with the empire] on equal terms, gave hostages, laid aside their hostility, and were encircled with forts; and this was done so carefully and methodically that no new part of Britain was ever won over after so little harrying."

The references to march-discipline and personal reconnaissance are, it must be confessed, part of the current picture of a good commander--they turn up again, as Birley has pointed out, in Statius' poetical account of the mild Bolanus. Like only too much in Roman and late Greek historical writing, as well as in modern journalism, they are part of the convention. However, this need not mean that they are untrue of Agricola. The reference to estuaries suggests that Agricola advanced by the west coast route, and that North Lancashire, Westmorland and Cumberland were among the areas, raided in earlier years, which were now finally taken in and consolidated. The western route is, after all, the shortest route to mid-Scotland--Edinburgh

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Agricola and Roman Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 186

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.