The Dependent Empire, 1900-1948: Colonies, Protectorates, and the Mandates - Vol. 7

By Frederick Madden; John Darwin | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The first half of the twentieth century saw the Dominions securing self-government in the fullest sense including those subjects (defence and foreign policy) previously considered as reserved for the imperial power. It also witnessed India, the first of the non-European dependencies, achieving by a slow but pertinacious process that same independence - the 'precisely similar' status 'to that of . . . Canada' within the 'say 50, say 70 years hence' as prophesied by a founder of the Indian Congress, Allan Hume, in 1888: moreover it retained that full membership of the Commonwealth, as a republic [Vol. VI p. 179]. In the dependent empire of colonies and protectorates, as well as mandates undertaken by Britain under the League of Nations following the first World War, there was indeed some progress in the same direction: but it was perhaps a stately unhurried painstaking procession for the most part [No. 10], for there seemed constantly more to be done in preparation and still endless time to do it. In some colonies, however, there were remarkable advances, even novel experimentation (e.g. Ceylon, Malta) while in a few cases ( Malta, Cyprus) there were reverses. Generally the mood was to avoid confrontation and to outflank opposition, and the object was to maintain 'peace, order and good government', with due concern for justice and tranquillity in dependencies, reluctantly assumed as hostages to fortune in that somnambulant kleptomania which Seeley characterised as 'a fit of absence of mind' and which were proving embarrassingly costly and fraught with complex internal and communal problems. In the tropical dependencies there was, in the footsteps of Lugard, something of a fetish for 'indirect rule' - the use of indigenous institutions, chiefs and notables to collaborate with, and bear a share in the responsibilities of, imperial rule. This aspect of colonial government was not new - it had been employed by Sir William Johnston in America [Vol. II, p. 521: III, p. 155): George Maclean in the Gold Coast [Vol. V, pp. 403-6: Sir Arthur Gordon in Fiji [Vol. V, p. 593] and Sir William MacGregor and Sir Hubert Murray in Papua - but it had the twin merit of being economical and convenient for the imperial power, and seeming sympathetic and traditional to the subject peoples.

Amid a growing barrage of criticism - some constructive, much misinformed and often deliberately so - against empire, a good deal of the old imperial self-assurance drained away, to be replaced by doubt whether an alien metropolitan power could spare the effort, money and dedication required to solve seemingly intractable colonial problems. But to liberate the colonies or to withdraw from empire in haste would be seen as a shameless, reckless and selfish surrender of a trust - an act of dishonourable irresponsibility. Nor was there any urgent domestic pressure to dismantle an imperial system which, if not lauded (and often seen as an inherited burden), was broadly accepted as a fact of life, a part of the scenery and a legacy of history. Moreover, from the envy of foreign powers (e.g. German and Italian demands for coloniesb - 'a place in the sun'), it did appear, perhaps surprisingly to many in Britain, that the possession of an empire still gave Britain an enhanced status as a world power and there was no sense therefore to indulge capriciously in reckless self-deprivation of what might prove to be assets. The British Empire Exhibition and the posters of the Empire Marketing Board in the 1920s sought to make the public more empire-conscious. The Colonial Development Act of 1929 was lotended to spread the message to the British public that colonies might after all provide some return - perhaps in increase of British exports and even in job-creation; only at the beginning of the second World War did that

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dependent Empire, 1900-1948: Colonies, Protectorates, and the Mandates - Vol. 7
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xvii
  • Abbreviations xxiii
  • Secretaries of State xxvi
  • I - Colonial Rule: Adjustments in Attitudes and Dimensions 1
  • II - Constitutional Reforms in the Colonies and Dependencies 54
  • Index 860
  • About the Editors *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 876

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.